Scooby-Doo (character)

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This article is about the character. For other uses, see Scooby-Doo.
Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo (character).png
Species: Dog (Great Dane)
Gender: Male
Member of: Mystery Incorporated
Scooby Doobies
Fearless Detective Agency
Affiliation: Shaggy Rogers
Daphne Blake
Fred Jones
Velma Dinkley
Vincent Van Ghoul
The Hex Girls
Occupation: Mascot
Sleuth
Sports team captain
Goals: Folowing and helping the gang on mysteries
Father: Dada-Doo
Mother: Mumsy-Doo
Sibling(s): One sister, Ruby
Three brothers, Yabba, Skippy, Howdy
Other relative(s): Six cousins, Scooby-Dee, Scrappy-Doo, Whoopsy-Doo, Dooby-Dooby-Doo, Dixie-Doo, Scooby-Dum
One uncle, Horton
Ancestor, Missing Link
Marital status: In a fantasy, Amber was his mate
Children: Unnamed puppies in aforementioned fantasy
First appearance: WAY: "What a Night for a Knight" (1969)
Played by: Don Messick (1969-96)
Keith Scott (1981)
Hadley Kay (1997)
George Lowe (1997)
Scott Innes (since 1998)
Neil Fanning (2002, 2004)
Frank Welker (since 2002)
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A Pup Named Scooby-Doo
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Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
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Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed
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What's New, Scooby-Doo?
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Shaggy & Scooby-Doo Get a Clue!
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Scooby-Doo! The Mystery Begins
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Straight Outta Nowhere
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Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated
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Scooby-Doo! Adventures: The Mystery Map
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Be Cool, Scooby-Doo!
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Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
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Scooby Apocalypse
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Scooby-Doo and Guess Who?
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Scoob!

Scooby-Doo is a talking anthropomorphic dog, who is the main character and protagonist of the Scooby-Doo animated franchise. His voice was originated by Don Messick. Besides being capable of human speech, he also has other anthropomorphic abilities, but remains the pet of Shaggy Rogers, and is the mascot of Mystery Incorporated, who is usually a gang of teenagers with a strong sense of purpose to solve mysteries and crimes.

Throughout the years, Hanna-Barbera, Cartoon Network, and Warner Bros. Animation, as well as book and video game publishers, have conceived several incarnations, which don't always fit together because new writers have come on board and disregarded what has come before or there has been a complete reboot, but the general concept has been the same, perhaps except for DC Comics' radically altered Scooby Apocalypse.

Character description

Unlike an average Great Dane, Scooby-Doo has a single shade of brown fur with some black spots covering the upper half of his body. He has a small chin, a long sausage-like tail, a sloped back, and bowed legs. He wears a teal collar with a diamond-shaped name tag; His tag bears the initials "SD".

Sharing personality traits with his owner Shaggy, Scooby is constantly hungry and is scared easily by many things. The two refuse to help out Mystery Inc. in solving haunted crimes, but are encouraged to do so when offered Scooby Snacks. Eating the snacks temporarily made Scooby appear more heroic and loyal than he is.

Beyond having the same traits as Shaggy, Scooby also has a bit of mischief in himself. He tends to do scare pranks on others and would snatch up food from Shaggy.

Abilities

Scooby has the interesting ability to talk in English, albeit in a broken matter. His speech mainly consists of pronouncing the letter "R" at the start of most words and noises he made. Though incoherent at first, most people including Mystery Inc. can understand him perfectly, if they acknowledge that he can speak at all. In earlier installments of the franchise, he is a speech-impaired dog who could only spurt out single words and/or short sentences. However, in recent years (most notably in Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated), Scooby rarely has his speech impediment and can speak in fuller sentences. He is also able to talk to other animals (such as dogs), which may come in handy whenever the gang is in need of help of more information.

Apart from his speech, Scooby also has other anthropomorphic qualities to him. He is able to stand on his hind legs, and his paws have opposite thumbs which at times function like human hands. His body can morph to mimic any and all monsters, along with some humans, too. His tail is fully prehensile, able to swing from or press buttons in certain situations.

Appearances

TV series

Movies

Specials

Theme park rides

Shorts

Comics

Books

Video games

Stage performances

Biography

Those Original Mysteries

The N̶e̶w̶ Decades Old Scooby-Doo M̶o̶v̶i̶e̶s̶ 40 Minute Episodes

Back to Basics

Dynomic Duo

Scooby Doobies FTW

Scooby Hollywood-Meta

The Scrappy years

Scrappy Saves the Show

Daphne, Freddy, and Velma MIA

Fearless Scooby

Daphne Tests Well

Gotta Catch 'em All

Celebrating another 50 years! 50 years of fun!

The Coolest Pup Around

You Ain't Never Had a Dog like Scoob

THIS TIME THE MONSTERS ARE REAL

Cartoon Network Spoofs

Harvey Birdman Represents

Scooby Gets Real

Scooby Goes (Pop)Punk

What's New in the Movies

Gonna Sing This Song ALL DAY LONG

Scooby Gets Real (again)

Crystal Cove Chronicles

Scooby Ain't Nobody's Puppet

Scooby in the Lego world

Scooby Griffin

Scooby-Doo and Guess Who the Creators Wanted to See Thirty Years Ago?

Scooby Sells Out

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In the Sabrina, the Teenage Witch episode "Unplugged," Sabrina zaps herself into Leonard's computer to remove footage of when she used her powers in the Scorch office, meeting the screensaver versions of Scooby and Shaggy in the process.

Looneyverse

In the film Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Scooby and Shaggy are at a restaurant with Matthew Lillard who have umbrage with his portrayal as Shaggy in Scooby-Doo. Shaggy tells Lillard he made him look like a "space cadet" and better not "goof on him" in the sequel, Scooby will offer him a Scooby Snack in a nasty way.

In the Warner Bros. Serververse in Space Jam: A New Legacy, the gang (based on their Scoob! designs), arrive at the basketball game between the Tune Squad and the Goon Squad in the Mystery Machine, then watch from outside the van. Mystery Inc., like all the other IPs, has no particular preference and just reacts to whatever is happening.

Like a Good Neighbour...

The gang gets help from State Farm agent Lucy Rodas after the Mystery Machine gets knocked into a ditch by the Creeper.

Scooby tries to make a phone call to Mysteries Insurance, but they can't understand him.

Scooby is shocked to discover that Shaggy can't eat after getting a huge bill from Mysteries Insurance, with the narrator suggesting that he should get help from State Farm.

Titans Go!

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Scooby appears twice in Teen Titans Go! The first time as a non-speaking cameo with Shaggy in "I See You," when they appear in the Mystery Machine next to Beast Boy and Cyborg in the T-Car during their stakeout song. Next, is a full guest appearance in "Cartoon Feud," when Scooby and his friends are forced by Control Freak to compete against the Teen Titans in a game of Family Feud.

Scooby takes a step back in Scholastic's Daphne and Velma

SCOOB! on the Big Screen

Scooby in the Funny Books

Scooby Survives the Apocalypse

Scooby-Doo in the Cyber Realm of Video Games

Development

Scooby began life as a bongo playing big shaggy dog called Too Much.[1] There was some fear out of having him a Great Dane due to the comparisons with Marmaduke. The name "Scooby-Doo" apparently came from CBS children's programming executive, Fred Silverman, who was on a plane one day listening to Frank Sinatra sing "Strangers in the Night," although according to Takamoto in his book My Life with a Thousand Characters, there was another dog called Scooby he saw in the Hanna-Barbera archives dating back to the early 1960s.[2]

Gallery

Main article: Scooby-Doo (character)/Gallery

Toys and merchandise

Main article: Scooby-Doo (character)/Toys

Behind the scenes

In popular culture

  • In the film Deathdream, also known as Dead of Night, Andy's bedroom light switch is decorated with a light switch plate/cover of Scooby and the Mystery Machine in his bedroom.
  • In the Red Razors arc of the comic 2000AD, a group of Sov-Block mercenary enforcers called themselves the Spooky Doo Gang, due to owning a dog called Spooky who resembled a green Scooby-Doo, with "S"s over his body.
  • Wayne and Garth are unhappy about the ending to their film Wayne's World, so they redo it by doing the "Scooby-Doo ending," as Garth calls it. They transition back to Wayne's basement, where they unmask Benjamin to really be Old Man Withers, who runs the haunted amusement park. Angered by them, he declares, "And I would have gotten away with it, too, if it hadn't been for you snooping kids!" Pleased with the outcome, Garth says to Wayne in a Scooby-like voice, "Good one, Shaggy," and Wayne replies that it was an "excellent Scooby-Doo ending."
  • In the Darkwing Duck episode "Can't Bayou Love," Gumbo the alligator whelps "Ruh-roh" before falling down a sewer drain at the climax of his defeat.
  • In The Brady Bunch Movie, Alice tells Greg that she washed his Scooby-Doo bedsheets, after Greg had just informed his brothers of how mature he was. Peter and Bobby laugh, with the latter even jokingly adding, "Scooby-Dooby-Doo!"
  • In the Moesha episode "The Regulations of Love," Moesha was critical of Neicy's choice of dance date (Ernest) by calling him "Mumbles," who according to her, made Scooby-Doo sound like James Earl Jones.
  • In Disney's Doug episode "Doug's Bloody Buddy," the teaser has a fantasy of the kids dressed similar to Mystery Inc. Porkchop is, of course, Scooby's counterpart, and has a diamond-shaped dog tag, spots added, and his voice is deeper to match.
  • In the film Slappy and the Stinkers, Witz says that Mr. Brinway runs like Scooby-Doo when being chased by the Stinkers' modified leaf blower.
  • In the 1998 Godzilla film, Audrey has a Scooby stuffed doll in her room.
  • In the film Can't Hardly Wait, Walter mimics Scooby's ending catchphrase, "Scooby-Dooby-Doo!" when another stoner says how Velma "didn't get much play."
  • At the end of the Batman Beyond episode "Rebirth Part I," when Terry entered the grounds of Wayne Manor, he called a protective Ace Scooby when telling him to back off.
  • In the Student Bodies episode "Snowed In," Mags and Flash bond over Scooby-Doo by singing the Where Are You! theme song. When their friends come in, who are surprised the two are getting along, are asked what the nature of Scooby and Scrappy's relationship is.
  • In the Boy Meets World episode "Can I Help to Cheer You," Tommy repeats back to Eric how he told him that they were the greatest team since Scooby and Shaggy. In Tommy's innocent reasoning of convincing Eric to adopt him, Tommy said that Scooby didn't think it was impossible to save Shaggy when he fell into a well.
  • In the film Free Enterprise, Robert wears underwear with Scooby's face printed across them.
  • In the Arthur segment "The Rat Who Came to Dinner," Mr. Ratburn lives with Arthur while his roof is being repaired, and shows him his old tape of Spooky Poo, which is a parody of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, starring a group of anthropomorphic animals who have a mascot kangaroo called Spooky-Poo, who wears a tag similar to Scooby's. Later, Mr. Ratburn wears a t-shirt with Spooky-Poo on it.
  • There is an episode of Mike, Lu & Og called "Scuba Doobie Doo," as an homage to Scooby's catchphrase "Scooby-Dooby-Doo."
  • In the Timon and Pumbaa episode "Werehog of London," a fortune teller warns Timon and Pumbaa that no one is safe from the curse of the werehog, not even "those meddling teens and their pesky dog." Then the camera reveals an orange and blue van resembling the Mystery Machine that has been abandoned after it was knocked into a lampost.
  • In the Celebrity Jeopardy! sketch, MacDonald as Burt Reynolds replies, "Who is Scooby-Doo?" when asked, "What Sound Does a Doggie Make?" He goes further on to say, "That was a funny dog, Scooby-Doo. He drove around in a van and solved mysteries." Will Ferrell as Alex Trebek says that that is incorrect, but Reynolds says he isn't and that remembers he had a "pal" Scrappy.
  • In Archie's Weird Mysteries #6, Hot Dog becomes a parody of Scooby, crying "Ruh-roh" when something scary happens. His owner, Jughead, likewise becomes a parody of Shaggy. Jughead and Hot Dog eat from a box of Gooby Snax, with a dog resembling Scooby himself.
  • In the ER episode "Be Patient," a kid has a Scooby printed on the backpack.
  • In the book P.E.A.C.E.: A Novel of Police Terror, two members of the Real Peace vigilante group go on TV wearing a Scooby-Doo mask and dressed as Shaggy.
  • In Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? series 8, episode 15, the £300 question is "What is the name of the cartoon dog who solves mysteries with Shaggy?"
  • In the Everybody Loves Raymond episode "It's Supposed to be Fun," Raymond speaks badly about his son Geoffrey to the basketball coach that he runs around pretending he's Scooby-Doo, which Raymond discovers Geoffrey has heard when he turns his back. Raymond, feeling ashamed and embarrassed, tries to cover it up by greeting Geoffrey and saying goodbye to the coach in a Scooby-like voice.
  • In the film Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, the title characters hitchhike in a green van owned by a bunch of odd adults vaguely resembling Mystery Incorporated. They have a Great Dane with a dog tag similar to Scooby's, but it is rectangular-shaped with the word "Dog." When Jay and Silent Bob get high, they imagine the Great Dane to comically talk like Scooby (voiced by Mark Hamill). In reality, this is Jay's dream. In a deleted scene, it goes a step too far by showing the Scooby doppelganger's genitalia.
  • Scooby's catchphrase is referenced in the CSI: Crime Scene Investiation episode "Scuba-Doobie-Doo."
  • In a game of "Questionable Impressions" of the November 21, 2001 episode of the American Whose Line Is It Anyway?, Wayne Brady did an impersonation of Scooby needing the bathroom.
  • Scooby's catchphrase is referenced in the Courage the Cowardly Dog episode "Scuba-Scuba Doo."
  • In the Drawn Together episode "Toot goes Bollywood," at the beginning of the episode, Foxxy is making love to Scooby, who she mistakes for Astro. He later turns down an offer to sleep with Toot by saying, "Ruck no."
  • In the film The Master of Disguise, two guards discuss the first live-action movie and despite how real Scooby looked, it was only computer generated.
  • In the film Freddy vs. Jason, Gibb, Kia, and Lori play a verbal game of "Marry, Fuck, Kill," with the former proposing Fred, Scooby, and Shaggy. Kia and Lori rightly refuse to answer her suggestion. Later, the van in the movie is mocked by Deputy Stubbs for looking like the "Scooby van."
  • In the Danny Phantom episode "The Million Dollar Ghost," Scaredy Cat, an analog of Scooby, is the tiger mascot of the Groovy Gang. Scaredy Cat has a dog tag similar to the shape of Scooby's. Scaredy Cat also took bribes in the form of Kitty Krunch.
  • Scooby is referenced in the Final Destination books, where he is a crayon drawing in Destination Zero, and mentioned in End of the Line and Dead Man's Hand.
  • In The Life and Times of Juniper Lee episode "I've Got You Under My Skin," Monroe the talking Scottish dog complains about being transformed into a double of Ray Ray, as he sees himself as someone very important in Juniper's life, saying "I'm not just Scooby-Doo, you know." This makes Ray Ray comment that Scooby-Doo is awesome and that they should get a dog. Later, when Ray Ray is impressed with Monroe, he apologises by saying, "I stand corrected my friend, Scooby-Doo's got nothing on ya."
  • In the King of the Hill episode "Death Picks Cotton," Bobby wants to get steak thrown in his mouth like Scooby at a teppanyaki steakhouse. Later, he gets his wish, and says, "Scooby-Dooby-Doo!"
  • In the film Sydney White, Lenny wants Sydney to feel settled in the attic, so he gives her his Scooby night light.
  • Scooby's name is alluded to in the Johnny Test episode "Johnny Dukey Doo," when Johnny and his talking dog, Dukey, team up with his sisters and next door neighbor to investigate a haunted mansion. During this time, Johnny and Dukey disguise themselves as waiters to fool the ghosts, as Scooby and Shaggy would do.
  • In the film The House Bunny, the dim Shelley mentioned she wore a Scooby-Doo mask for a month because she thought she was ugly, until a boy took it off and showed her she was wearing it upside down.
  • In the film Paul Blart: Mall Cop, the title characters says, "Scuba-Dooby-Doo," before unleashing a scuba tank on a henchman.
  • In the Aqua Teen Hunger Force episode "One Hundred," Meatwad took a shape similar to Scooby-Doo when Master Shake took the Aqua Teen Hunger Force into a parody of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! He wasn't too pleased with what had become of him, but ironically lightened up when the 100 monster took Tabitha to rape and kill her, happily shouting his name, "Meaty-Meaty-Moo!" He is then suddenly joined by a similar, but smaller looking Scrappy-type of sidekick.
  • In the Smallville episode "Abandoned," Lois said to Shelby that he was Scooby to Clark's Shaggy.
  • In the Psych episode "In Plain Fright," Lassiter describes Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! without knowing the name, by saying, "He [Shawn] and Gus think they're in some cartoon with a talking Great Dane and a psychedelically painted van" to which O'Hara responds correctly, "Scooby-Doo?"
  • In the Ben 10: Ultimate Alien episode "Revenge of the Swarm," Kevin removes the toupée from the janitor which startles him and causes him to trip over his bucket and knock himself out, but Kevin says he'll be okay and things will be a lot clearer for him when he wakes up because it's something he saw on TV, to which Gwen retorts, "Tell me it didn't involve a cartoon dog."
  • In the Castle episode "Demons," when Esposito asks Beckett why she let Ryan chase ghosts with Castle, she believes they may be good for each other, stating, "Maybe Shaggy'll keep Scooby out of trouble."
  • In the So Random! episode "Cole & Dylan Sprouse," Scooby and Shaggy are jailed for 20 years in the "Sally Jensen, Kid Lawyer" sketch, for being irresponsible cartoon role models for a young girl who after losing her bike, stole her neighbor's Great Dane, took her mother's minivan, and fed the dog Scooby Bites the whole time which leads to a "big Scooby doo-doo" in the back seat. While behind bars, Scooby wails, "Rim rinnocent." Jensen, who doesn't believe them, harasses Scooby and Shaggy from the other side, and informs them they'll be away for 20 years (140 in dog years), which scares Scooby, who says, "Ruh-roh," and into the arms of Shaggy.
  • In the New Teen Titans short "Turn Back the Clock," Mad Mod turns back time altering the appearances of the Teen Titans with each passing decade, with the 70s making them look like Mystery Inc.; Beast Boy is Scooby, who has an empty box of vegetarian BB Snacks, which makes him whine by saying "Ruh-roh."
  • Hamlet the dog is a parody of Scooby in the independent horror film Saturday Morning Massacre (later retitled Saturday Morning Mystery).
  • In the film Pain & Gain, Daniel has Scooby seat covers in his sports car. Sorina later ridicules him for this because he tried to trick her that he was a flashy director.
  • In the film Bad Neighbors, two pledges are called Scooby and Shaggy when told to investigate.
  • In the Ben 10: Omniverse episode "Mystery, Incorporeal," Zed makes a couple of grunting sounds that make him sound like Scooby.
  • The series is parodied in the Austin & Ally episode "Mysteries & Meddling Kids," when while at a disco party, Dez and his friends dress up as his favorite characters from a 70s cartoon called Groovy Goat and the Mystery Bunch, with Dez borrowing his cousin's goat and calling it Groovy Goat. Dez, as Groovy's owner, Reggie, treats Groovy like Scooby as if he could actually talk, which includes Reggie bribing Groovy with a "Groovy treat."
  • In the Bojack Horseman episode "Higher Love," the Ryan Seacrest Type morning talk show host responded with a "Ruh-roh" when learning that major Hollywoo[sic] agent Ronnie Bonito had died.
  • In the book The Skeleton Haunts a House, Sid, the titular living character, dresses up in a Scooby fursuit and his friend Georgia accompanies him as Velma.
  • In the Comic Book Men episode "Captain and the Clerk," Kevin Smith begins the show by declaring it the only one to be smart enough to keep Scooby away from Groot.
  • In the film Deadpool, Wade misses a ball toss, to which Vanessa says, "Ruh-roh," which Wade repeats.
  • In Betty & Veronica #1, Archie says, "Ruh-roh," after Veronica says tells Jughead that love isn't food.
  • In the film Characterz, once the park director's scheme of setting up the mascots has been discovered, he says, "And I would have gotten away with it, if it hadn't been for you meddling kids," which makes one of the mascots, Jerry, reply, "Ruh-roh."
  • In the Steven Universe episode "Ocean Gem," when the gang's water doubles prepare to battle against them, Amethyst says, "Ruh-roh."
  • In the Regular Show episode "The Dream Warrior," Rigby and Mordecai introduce Pops to a cartoon called Funkie Wunky and the Groovy Gang which features a Scooby-type called Funkie Wunky. After the cartoon, Pops goes to bed, happily saying "Funky" to himself as he sleeps. He then has a dream of what he had just watched and had Rigby in the role of Funkie.
  • In the October 3, 2017 episode of Jeopardy!, a question in the TV category for $200 was, "He's the Loveable Great Dane Who Hangs Out With Daphne, Freddy, Shaggy & Velma," with the answer being, "Who is Scooby-Doo?" (with Austin giving a bit of a voice).
  • In the Teen Titans Go! episode "Costume Contest," Robin draws himself and the Teen Titans as Mystery Inc., with Beast Boy as Scooby.
  • In "The Spooky Badge," an episode of the preschool series Hey Duggee, the Squirrels play dress up as Mystery Inc., with Roly as Scooby, who when scared, jumps into the arms of Happy, who is dressed as Shaggy.
  • In the Torchwood audio book The Death of Captain Jack, John characterizes Torchwood Three as Scooby-Doo, "but without the dog and the lesbian."
  • In Simpsons Comics #242, there is a story entitled, "Scooby-Dont'!," Ralph Wiggum is dressed like his creation Wiggle Puppy, but looks more like Scooby-Doo (well, in fact, more like Scrappy-Doo, but let's not split dog hairs). During this time, Ralph also speaks with a speech impediment due to accidentally biting his tongue.
  • In the film Show Dogs, Max says "Ruh-roh" when losing control of the plane.
  • At the end of The Amazing World of Gumball episode "The Spinoffs," Rob reads some text off of Timmy, the Internet, finding a show to replace Gumball that would be something akin to Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, with a Great Dane and his "kooky friends" who solve mysteries in a van.
  • In the Judge Judy episode "My Pit Bull Is Like Scooby Doo!; Car Slammed Into Newspaper Stand," the defendant Jon Hopton defended his dog that it was more like Scooby, but Judge Judy just called him an idiot for saying.
  • In Issue #64 of Harley Quinn, Justice League Dark is a parody of Mystery Inc., with Detective Chimp substituting Scooby, who now wears a similar collar to Scooby.
  • In the Bless the Harts episode "Hug N' Bugs," Betty says "Ruh-roh" when the water cuts out while she's taking a shower.
  • In season 19, episode 25 of the BBC series Antiques Road Trip, Stephanie Connell mentions that she used to love Scooby, then says, "Raggy," in Scooby's voice, entertaining her competitor, Philip Serrell, who also says he used to love Scooby (which given his age, seems somewhat unlikely).
  • In The Healing Powers of Dude episode "Second Step: Homeroom," when Noah throws up, his emotional support dog, Dude, says, "Ruh-roh."
  • In the Amphibia episode "The Sleepover to End All Sleepovers," Marcy forgets herself when she accidentally calls Anne "Scoob" when they encounter a ghostly jellyfish, which confuses Anne.
  • In the Big Mouth episode "Poop Madness," Jay wants Lola to replace the Scooby plate she broke during a fight they had.
  • In the Mom episode "Scooby-Doo Checks and Salisbury Steaks," Andy asks Jill if getting Scooby-Doo-themed checks would make him look "cool that I like to solve mysteries or creepy older guy with a van?"
  • In the Supergirl episode "Prom Night," Alex said that when Kara was younger she and her boyfriend had appointed themselves Midvale's "Scooby-Duo" by all the rescues they had made.
  • The song "Syrup" by Slum Ak starts with the rapper doing an impression of Scooby's laugh.
  • In the Disney+ film Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers, when Dale wants to call Gadget and Zipper to help him and Chip find Monterey, he says not to as "[they]'re as much real detectives as the Scooby-Doo gang."

Animaniacs (1993)

  • "Slappy Goes Walnuts:" Doug reminds Slappy of a very young Scooby-Doo, which according to her is sad.
  • "Back in Style:" The Warner siblings are loaned to a Hanna-Barbera-type cartoon called Uhuru, Where Are You?, with Uhuru being a stand in for Scooby, voiced by Frank Welker. The cartoon predictably fails when the Warners harass everyone.

Becoming Human

  • The web series revolves around the death of Matt, a student who was drowned by his teacher in one of the boys' toilet cubicles, the walls of which have been vandalized by two drawings of Scooby. The first one is a very average one seen only in the first episode, although the scene is reused in "Update 34 - The Story So Far," while the second one, a vast improvement over the first, which includes Scooby wearing a hat, is featured in episodes one, five, and eight, as well as its appearance in episodes one and five being reshown in "Update 34 - The Story So Far." Matt also refers to the second drawing in the first episode.
  • At the beginning of episode 6, Adam lists Shaggy and Scooby as a great crime fighting duo due to their chemistry.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer

  • Xander wears a t-shirt with Scooby at the beginning of "When She Was Bad."
  • Willow wears a t-shirt with Scooby on it in "School Hard," and then in "Out of Sight Out of Mind," one of both Scooby and Shaggy printed on.

The Cleveland Show

  • "Nightmare on Grace Street:" Cleveland and Rallo are forced to put an end to their feud by staying in a spooky mansion at night on Halloween. Rallo says it's nice, but Cleveland responded that it "seemed a little Scooby-Doo". He then says "Zoinks" like Shaggy, and jumps on Rallo like Scooby would jump on Scooby, with appropriate sound effects. Rallo then feeds him a dog biscuit, with Cleveland responding in a happy Scooby-like tone.
  • "Sex and the Biddy:" When Rallo was served a giant pastrami on rye, he responded, "What am I, fucking Scooby-Doo?"
  • "Die Semi-Hard:" In a Die Hard parody, Tim/Hans Gruber mocks Cleveland/John McClane, his "mystery man," for watching too many American TV mysteries, listing a bunch of them, but Cleveland is partial to cartoon dogs, ending the conversation with "Scooby-Dooby-Doo, motherfucker", although the swear word is bleeped out. The next time they speak on the walkie talkies, he addresses him as Scooby-Doo, and asks where he is in reference to the Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, and Cleveland responds jokingly in Scooby's voice, "Rover here!" Then when they meet for their final encounter, Tim repeats "Scooby-Dooby-Doo motherfucker" right before he plans to kill Cleveland's wife.

Doctor Who

  • In The Curse of Fatal Death, a 1999 Comic Relief sketch on BBC One, Emma likened the Doctor to Father Christmas, the Wizard of Oz, and Scooby.
  • In the book The Crooked World, there is a parody of Scooby called Fearless.
  • In the episode "The Age of Steel," Pete called the Preachers "Scooby-Doo and the gang."
  • In the episodes "Blink" and "Knock Knock," the spooky houses were compared to a house where Scooby-Doo would live.
  • In the short story "Secret of Arkatron" in the Doctor Who Annual 2011, the Doctor called Scooby a pussycat even though he knew he was a dog, which made him a "scaredy-cat dog."
  • When the Doctor wore a scuba diving suit in the book Dark Horizons, he said he would terrorize Scooby-Doo in reference to the Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! episode "A Clue for Scooby-Doo."
  • In the book The Last Pharoah, Andy used "Scooby" as modern slang for supplanting the word "clue."
  • In the Doctor Who Magazine #489, in the The Daft Dimension segment, a parallel universe depicts the robot dog K9 has taken on the role of Scooby.

The Fairly OddParents

Main article: The Fairly OddParents
  • Channel Chasers (part 2): There is a TV show called Snooper Dawg and the Clue Crew, with the mascot dog being a parody of Scooby but looks like Goober and talks like Snoop Dog. Cosmo and Wanda also take the form of Snooper. Snooper's Shaggy-like friend jumps into his arms, which Shaggy has occasionally done with Scooby, and in the middle of a chase scene, Snooper and his Shaggy-like friend get a snack.
  • "Dread 'n' Breakfast:" During Crocker, Tootie, and Dark Laser stay at the Turner Bed and Breakfast, they are out to get Timmy, who at one point asks Dark Laser what one of his buttons does which he says turns on his 70s chase music, which begins a Scooby-Dooby-doors chase. In the middle of the chase, parodies of Shaggy and Scooby appear, being chased by the Headless Horseman; the Shaggy parody says "Zinkies, Doob! Like, keep running man!"
  • "The Wand That Got Away:" When Timmy and his fairy companions go on the search for Cosmo's wand, they take on the roles of Mystery Inc., with Sparky becoming a parody of Scooby simply by adding a diamond-shaped dogtag to his collar. He owns a van from the 1970s that resembles the Mystery Machine. Sparky calls Timmy "Scoob," and uses Scooby's catchphrases, "Ruh-roh," and "Rooby-Rooby-Roo," which always startles Timmy as if Sparky has committed a federal offense, but he always makes up an excuse as to why he says them.
  • "Let Sleeper Dogs Lie:" Sparky kept a DVD of his previous owners, which included a group of kids resembling Mystery Incorporated who solved mysteries. Thanks to the Mystery Mobile, they escaped from a castle haunted by a cloaked ghost. The Shaggy doppelganger commentated in fear, "Zoinks, Sparky."

Family Guy

Main article: Family Guy
  • "Chitty Chitty Death Bang:" With the television transmitter cut, Peter wonders what the Scooby gang is up to, with the scene then cutting to an adult spin-off spoof called The Scooby-Doo Murder Files, where Mystery Incorporated investigates and describes in detail how someone was killed, as well being able to curse, as Fred demonstrates by saying, "Son of a bitch." There's also a van with the words "Murder Machine" written on the side as a reference to The Mystery Machine. Scooby is voiced by Seth MacFarlane.
  • "Family Guy Viewer Mail:" A segment parodies the Little Rascals with the adults as kids, which includes a portion of time at a spooky mansion, where the regressed boys also copy the hallway chase gag, featuring Mystery Incorporated in a cameo also running out of one door and into another.
  • "Deep Throats:" In a DVD-exclusive scene, when Brian and Stewie sneak into the town hall, they run into Mystery Incorporated, but Stewie gets rid of them by humming their own walk music against them.
  • "Stewie Loves Lois:" Stewie has a yogurt cup with Scooby's name and apparently Shaggy's eyes have been cut out just the way he likes it.
  • "Excellence in Broadcasting:" There is a parody of Scooby called Hot Dog.
  • "Stewie, Chris & Brian's Excellent Adventure:" Stewie tests Chris for his history class, by asking him who said, "We have nothing to fear, but fear itself"? Chris responds with both Scooby and Shaggy, to which Stewie angrily responds, "It's nobody on Scooby-Doo!"
  • "Dog Bites Bear:" Stewie tells Brian that his stuffed bear, Rupert, called Brian "Scooby Don't."

Family Matters

  • "Skip to My Lieu:" Urkel has Scooby slippers.
  • "Muskrat Love:" Eddie learned that Laura jokingly told her friend that he sleeps with a Scooby night light.

Futurama

Main article: Futurama
  • An unidentified episode of the second season would've had a fake sponsor for a dog food called Soylent Chow, with a Scooby soundalike voiceover saying, "It's really good."
  • "Fry Am the Egg Man:" The crew catches Mr. Peppy, the bone vampire, only to discover it is Angus McZongo in disguise. Shocked by the deceit, Amy cries out, "Jinkies, he Scooby-Doo'ed us!"
  • In the DVD audio commentary for Futurama: The Beast with a Billion Backs, Michael Rowe, a writer for the special, just randomly brings up how "[guest actor] David Cross was on a Scooby-Doo episode as himself", which gets a big laugh from everyone, and Billy West responds in a Scooby voice, "Ravid Ross?"
  • "Saturday Morning Fun Pit:" The 31st century incarnations of Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew watched a cartoon called Bendee-Boo and the Mystery Crew, in which the Planet Express crew were reimagined as members of Mystery Inc., with Bender taking on the role of Scooby-Doo. At the end of the opening intro, Bender says, "Rite my riny retal rass," and gets bribed with an alcoholic beverage called Bendee Brew.

Full House

  • Joey is a Scooby-Doo fan which is referenced in several episodes.
  • "Sea Cruise:" Joey gives a pep talk to Danny and Jesse which he said came from the heart, with the wording based on what he saw Scooby tell Scrappy from the previous Saturday morning.
  • "Baby Love:" Joey and Michelle's plants are called Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo, respectively. When Joey tells Michelle to water her plant he imitates Scooby's voice when saying," "Ri'm thirsty, Richelle! Water re!"
  • "Grand Gift Auto:" Jesse defends Joey's innocence of stealing a car by showing the officer his Scooby-Doo nightshirt, which Joey claims came with his bubble bath.

Gilmore Girls

  • In the Gilmore Girls episode "Run Away, Little Boy," a Scooby action figure is mysteriously under a glass of muffins in Luke's Diner.
  • "Welcome to the Dollhouse:" Luke doesn't care about Taylor's suggestion of renaming of the streets, saying that Taylor could rename his street Scooby-Doo Lane for all he cares.

Grojband

  • "Dance of the Dead:" The band all shouts "Zoinks" after seeing the zombies rise, and Kon jumps into Kin's arms.
  • "The Snuffles with Snarffles:" While Laney is recording Snarffles sneezing, she says, "Ruh-roh! Someone needs a tissue."

Hannah Montana

  • "We Are Family - Now Get Me Some Water:" Jackson, with no training, massages Sean's back, but only makes it worse. His reason for doing it the way he did is that he saw Scooby do it to Shaggy, who are supposed to be his cousins, instead of a cartoon as Sean pointed out.
  • "Hannah in the Streets with Diamonds:" Miley tries to get a hot dog stand moved away from her diamond (a parody of the stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame) by proposing the owner move it to Scooby-Doo's diamond, adding, "Rot dog on a rot dog."
  • "Killing Me Softly With His Height:" A big stuffed toy of Scooby was one of the prizes at a carnival booth's ring toss game.

Looney Tunes

Main article: Looney Tunes
  • Looney Tunes #71: The story, "Tazzy-Doo, Where Are You?," depicts several Looney Tunes characters as members of Mystery Inc., with the Tazmanian Devil as Scooby. Taz eats Tazzy-Snacks, and says, "Tazzy-Dazzy-Doo" when the mystery is solved.
  • For Warner Bros.' 100th anniversary, they celebrated by licensing a range of Looney Tunes Funko Pops with a Scooby-Doo motif, which included Taz's spinning body covered in Scooby's dog collar and tag. This was then shown in animated form with a special mashup short that featured the Looney Tunes cast as Mystery Incorporated who have caught the ghost of Mr. Hyde.

Teen Titans Go!

Main article: Teen Titans Go!
  • "Costume Contest:" Robin draws the Teen Titans as Mystery Inc. characters, with Beast Boy as Scooby.
  • "Justice League's Next Top Talent Idol Star: Second Greatest Team Edition Part 1:" Beast Boy is forced to sing "Happy Birthday" after Me-Too steals the song he intended to sing. Beast Boy drags it out by adding nonsensical lines like "Scooby-Doo on channel 2."

Robot Chicken

Main article: Robot Chicken
  • In the Robot Chicken skit "Laff-A-Munich" segment of the episode "Ban on the Fun," he and Shaggy are tasked with killing the Really Rottens after the murders of the Yogi Yahooeys. He is startled by Shaggy in the middle of the night and fires his gun randomly, unaware that the safety isn't on. After successfully killing the Rottens and being devasted by the death of Hong Kong Phooey, he enjoys a Scooby Snack.

Saturday Night Live

  • "Norm Macdonald/Dr. Dre & Snoop Dogg:" In the Celebrity Jeopardy! sketch, Macdonald as Burt Reynolds replies, "Who is Scooby-Doo?" when asked, "What Sound Does a Doggie Make?" He then goes on a tangent about Scooby, saying, "That was a funny dog, Scooby-Doo. He drove around in a van and solved mysteries." Will Ferrell as Alex Trebek says that that is incorrect, but Reynolds says he isn't and that remembers he had a "pal" Scrappy.
  • "Rob Lowe/Eminem:" In a skit about a fictional Crime TV program called Pros & Cons, the host brings on Scooby and Shaggy to defend themselves and the gang on sending Mr. Montgomery to jail, who allegedly dressed up as a ghost to scare people away from a run-down amusement park that had pirate treasure underneath. Scooby, played by a guy in a suit, would've preferred the "reath renalty" while Shaggy contends that it's their right as Americans. But Mr. Montgomery's lawyer bribes them to think differently with a box of Scooby Snacks.
  • "Billie Eilish:" During the Weekend Update sketch, Colin Jost begins to go on a tirade about the Chinese government, but is cut off and replaced with a technical difficulties card with an image of Michael Che saying "Ruh-roh!"

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2003)

  • "Future Shellshock:" The Turtles have been transported into the future, where Mikey gets stuck in a newspaper truck, which makes its way on the highway. Raphael reaches out to get him from another car, but Mikey misses and says "Ruh-roh."
  • "Turtle X-Tinction:" After using the "meddling kids" line, Mikey later says an "Aroo?" sound like Scooby when the Turtles find no one in Turtle X's cockpit.

That 70s Show

  • "Hyde Moves In:" While in a circle, getting high, Eric complains that nobody is caring about what Hyde is going through, when he becomes easily distracted by watching a ViewMaster, shouting, "Run, Scooby! Now! Run!"
  • "Afterglow:" After watching an episode of Scooby-Doo, the guys later get high, with Fez treating Kelso's sudden support of Eric as a mystery, "one suitable for Scooby-Doo and his gang of cartoon teenagers!" He then goes on to say how he wishes they were cartoon characters, with Fez imagining them in Hanna-Barbera's Scooby-Doo-esque designs with Scooby-Doo-esque music playing as they talk to each other. Fez, the first one to talk, after the transformation, sarcastically says, "Zoinks. That'd be super, Fez."

The Venture Bros.

Main article: The Venture Bros.
  • "Assassinanny 911:" Kim connects Fred Jones and Hank by referring to the latter as "the Scooby-Doo kid."
  • "¡Viva los Muertos!:" Groovy is a composite of Scooby and Harvey, the dog of David "Son of Sam" Berkowitz'a neighbor who he alleged was possessed and telling him to commit his murders, which also referenced the in-joke that Shaggy could only communicate with Scooby due to being a stoner.
  • "Now Museum--Now You Don't:" J.J. described what his brother was wearing as a "Scooby-Doo purple suit."
  • "Sphinx Rising:" When Mrs. The Monarch asks the Monarch how exactly they're going to get into the Venture compound even with their disguises, he has no idea and simply responds, "With our Scooby-Dooby-Doo magic masks."

Young Sheldon

  • "A Dog, a Squirrel, and a Fish Named Fish:" Sheldon is afraid of dogs to the point where he is even afraid of a cartoon dog such as Scooby, and that's where he begins in curbing his cynophobia, by watching "Hassle in the Castle" from Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!
  • "Bible Camp and a Chariot of Love:" George lays down his authority when Georgie buys a run-down van, so Georgie moves out of the house and into the van, reasoning that "Scooby-Doo lived in a van, and he turned out fine."

References

  1. ^ Takamoto, Iwao, Mallory, Michael (March 30, 2009) Iwao Takamoto: My Life with a Thousand Characters, page 127. University Press of Mississippi. Retrieved July 23, 2022.
  2. ^ Takamoto, Iwao, Mallory, Michael (March 30, 2009) Iwao Takamoto: My Life with a Thousand Characters, page 125. University Press of Mississippi. Retrieved July 23, 2022.